Laura Hickerson, Reverie

Laura’s work revolves around dreams and their representations being an expression of self.

Danee Castillo, Kiiyaa’aanii (Towering House) Quilt

Danee’s fabric art piece is a hybrid of her Western and Navajo cultures, mixing the textile traditions of both to express her wish for the safety and happiness of her people.

Ken Kokoszka, Encounters
Ken’s series of deep sea creatures is meant to evoke the sense of the uncanny in the viewer. This juxtaposition of the familiar and the strange allows viewers to both relate emotionally to the non-human subjects, while simultaneously being repulsed by their alien nature. Ken Kokoszka, Encounters
Ken’s series of deep sea creatures is meant to evoke the sense of the uncanny in the viewer. This juxtaposition of the familiar and the strange allows viewers to both relate emotionally to the non-human subjects, while simultaneously being repulsed by their alien nature.

Ken Kokoszka, Encounters

Ken’s series of deep sea creatures is meant to evoke the sense of the uncanny in the viewer. This juxtaposition of the familiar and the strange allows viewers to both relate emotionally to the non-human subjects, while simultaneously being repulsed by their alien nature.

Jennifer Burdess, Fragmentation
Jen’s work is made through a process of creating an image with charcoal pastel on mylar, and then allowing a patina to wash across the surface and rust after it binds with the surface. This creates beautiful and unique shapes which are representative of the underlying concept of the degradation of memory. Jen wishes to represent the physical loss of memory that occurs when memories are recalled in the brain, where memory is created and stored as bundles of protein, that are broken down each time the memory is retrieved. Jennifer Burdess, Fragmentation
Jen’s work is made through a process of creating an image with charcoal pastel on mylar, and then allowing a patina to wash across the surface and rust after it binds with the surface. This creates beautiful and unique shapes which are representative of the underlying concept of the degradation of memory. Jen wishes to represent the physical loss of memory that occurs when memories are recalled in the brain, where memory is created and stored as bundles of protein, that are broken down each time the memory is retrieved.

Jennifer Burdess, Fragmentation

Jen’s work is made through a process of creating an image with charcoal pastel on mylar, and then allowing a patina to wash across the surface and rust after it binds with the surface. This creates beautiful and unique shapes which are representative of the underlying concept of the degradation of memory. Jen wishes to represent the physical loss of memory that occurs when memories are recalled in the brain, where memory is created and stored as bundles of protein, that are broken down each time the memory is retrieved.

Desiree Biros
Deiree makes dozens and dozens of torn pieces of paper, stained with coffee and reworked with patina, that she strings together to make a hanging net which then casts intricate shadows across the wall and floor. Desiree Biros
Deiree makes dozens and dozens of torn pieces of paper, stained with coffee and reworked with patina, that she strings together to make a hanging net which then casts intricate shadows across the wall and floor. Desiree Biros
Deiree makes dozens and dozens of torn pieces of paper, stained with coffee and reworked with patina, that she strings together to make a hanging net which then casts intricate shadows across the wall and floor.

Desiree Biros

Deiree makes dozens and dozens of torn pieces of paper, stained with coffee and reworked with patina, that she strings together to make a hanging net which then casts intricate shadows across the wall and floor.

Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time. Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time. Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time. Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time. Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time. Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time. Ily Reiling
Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time.

Ily Reiling

Ily’s installation, which when complete will have five massive portraits hanging from the ceiling in a circle, each with a unique sculptural object placed behind it, is based upon her relationship with her family and each person’s own interpretation of time. The work is made from a wide variety of materials, including eye-glasses, photos, bone, and hair, all of which she relates back to the over-arching theme of time.

Jessica Johnson
Jessica’s work is based upon the female form and the obsession with food. Everything is drawn in pink and placed in pink frames, which gives the overall installation an eye-searing effect that simultaneously grabs attention and punishes the viewer. Jessica Johnson
Jessica’s work is based upon the female form and the obsession with food. Everything is drawn in pink and placed in pink frames, which gives the overall installation an eye-searing effect that simultaneously grabs attention and punishes the viewer. Jessica Johnson
Jessica’s work is based upon the female form and the obsession with food. Everything is drawn in pink and placed in pink frames, which gives the overall installation an eye-searing effect that simultaneously grabs attention and punishes the viewer. Jessica Johnson
Jessica’s work is based upon the female form and the obsession with food. Everything is drawn in pink and placed in pink frames, which gives the overall installation an eye-searing effect that simultaneously grabs attention and punishes the viewer.

Jessica Johnson

Jessica’s work is based upon the female form and the obsession with food. Everything is drawn in pink and placed in pink frames, which gives the overall installation an eye-searing effect that simultaneously grabs attention and punishes the viewer.

David Anderson, Stolen, Just a Little Forgetful
Dave’s work is based upon the loss of control and memory brought on by Alzheimer’s disease, which has greatly impacted his family. David Anderson, Stolen, Just a Little Forgetful
Dave’s work is based upon the loss of control and memory brought on by Alzheimer’s disease, which has greatly impacted his family. David Anderson, Stolen, Just a Little Forgetful
Dave’s work is based upon the loss of control and memory brought on by Alzheimer’s disease, which has greatly impacted his family.

David Anderson, Stolen, Just a Little Forgetful


Dave’s work is based upon the loss of control and memory brought on by Alzheimer’s disease, which has greatly impacted his family.

Student’s artwork raises controversy
On the same day as the show opening, one of our artist’s work was called into question and displayed in the news! Jake Smidt, whose work is titled The Reality of the Spectacle, was interviewed by 9 News to defend his art against complaints made by students at the Hospitality Center.
We in the Drawing Program agree with Jake’s splendid defense of his chosen subject and were honestly surprised that any controversy arose over it. We were also somewhat amused, because Jake’s carefully thought out concept is based upon the spectacle society creates through media and his art was built around the idea of the media saturating the public with dramatic information and creating identity through the filter of spectacle— which is exactly what happened when the media made a story about his art.
While this event has been interesting for art students at Metro, it is also somewhat distressing due to the lack of respect shown to an artist’s work. When one person had a problem with the work displayed, Jake’s name and title card was torn off the wall and vanished. The school then, under the pretense that the art might be “rogue art” that was not part of the show, literally ripped the work off the wall. The two pieces were torn and damaged, then nailed (crooked and mixed up) back onto the wall for the news interview.
Such a volatile reaction from both the school and members of the public sparked discussion amongst our class about why art can be immediately discarded simply for being misunderstood or disliked. The consensus was that the public is not well educated in art and art history. Art tends to be the first subject cut from education systems and is usually the most starkly taught subject, often teaching students how to make art without giving much background to the history of art. Even at the university level, art is an optional subject and is not often expanded on for students not studying the subject as a major or minor.
The fact is that Jake’s work was meant to question why killers are given so much attention in society for terrible crimes, to question why we are drawn more to horrific stories than to productive ones, and also to explore how tragedy can affect society as it is displayed through media. His work was intended to make people think about how media works and affects their lives. But, when viewed by someone uneducated in the arts, it is discredited and treated as trash. 
No art in this world is universally liked and understood, but every work of art should be given the chance to exist and influence people who want to discuss it. Art is at it’s best when it can make people think and feel more than they would alone, and Jake Smidt’s art does that. Hopefully, after seeing how well Jake explained the concept of his art, more people will seek to understand art that might confuse or disturb them, rather than dismissing it entirely. Student’s artwork raises controversy
On the same day as the show opening, one of our artist’s work was called into question and displayed in the news! Jake Smidt, whose work is titled The Reality of the Spectacle, was interviewed by 9 News to defend his art against complaints made by students at the Hospitality Center.
We in the Drawing Program agree with Jake’s splendid defense of his chosen subject and were honestly surprised that any controversy arose over it. We were also somewhat amused, because Jake’s carefully thought out concept is based upon the spectacle society creates through media and his art was built around the idea of the media saturating the public with dramatic information and creating identity through the filter of spectacle— which is exactly what happened when the media made a story about his art.
While this event has been interesting for art students at Metro, it is also somewhat distressing due to the lack of respect shown to an artist’s work. When one person had a problem with the work displayed, Jake’s name and title card was torn off the wall and vanished. The school then, under the pretense that the art might be “rogue art” that was not part of the show, literally ripped the work off the wall. The two pieces were torn and damaged, then nailed (crooked and mixed up) back onto the wall for the news interview.
Such a volatile reaction from both the school and members of the public sparked discussion amongst our class about why art can be immediately discarded simply for being misunderstood or disliked. The consensus was that the public is not well educated in art and art history. Art tends to be the first subject cut from education systems and is usually the most starkly taught subject, often teaching students how to make art without giving much background to the history of art. Even at the university level, art is an optional subject and is not often expanded on for students not studying the subject as a major or minor.
The fact is that Jake’s work was meant to question why killers are given so much attention in society for terrible crimes, to question why we are drawn more to horrific stories than to productive ones, and also to explore how tragedy can affect society as it is displayed through media. His work was intended to make people think about how media works and affects their lives. But, when viewed by someone uneducated in the arts, it is discredited and treated as trash. 
No art in this world is universally liked and understood, but every work of art should be given the chance to exist and influence people who want to discuss it. Art is at it’s best when it can make people think and feel more than they would alone, and Jake Smidt’s art does that. Hopefully, after seeing how well Jake explained the concept of his art, more people will seek to understand art that might confuse or disturb them, rather than dismissing it entirely. Student’s artwork raises controversy
On the same day as the show opening, one of our artist’s work was called into question and displayed in the news! Jake Smidt, whose work is titled The Reality of the Spectacle, was interviewed by 9 News to defend his art against complaints made by students at the Hospitality Center.
We in the Drawing Program agree with Jake’s splendid defense of his chosen subject and were honestly surprised that any controversy arose over it. We were also somewhat amused, because Jake’s carefully thought out concept is based upon the spectacle society creates through media and his art was built around the idea of the media saturating the public with dramatic information and creating identity through the filter of spectacle— which is exactly what happened when the media made a story about his art.
While this event has been interesting for art students at Metro, it is also somewhat distressing due to the lack of respect shown to an artist’s work. When one person had a problem with the work displayed, Jake’s name and title card was torn off the wall and vanished. The school then, under the pretense that the art might be “rogue art” that was not part of the show, literally ripped the work off the wall. The two pieces were torn and damaged, then nailed (crooked and mixed up) back onto the wall for the news interview.
Such a volatile reaction from both the school and members of the public sparked discussion amongst our class about why art can be immediately discarded simply for being misunderstood or disliked. The consensus was that the public is not well educated in art and art history. Art tends to be the first subject cut from education systems and is usually the most starkly taught subject, often teaching students how to make art without giving much background to the history of art. Even at the university level, art is an optional subject and is not often expanded on for students not studying the subject as a major or minor.
The fact is that Jake’s work was meant to question why killers are given so much attention in society for terrible crimes, to question why we are drawn more to horrific stories than to productive ones, and also to explore how tragedy can affect society as it is displayed through media. His work was intended to make people think about how media works and affects their lives. But, when viewed by someone uneducated in the arts, it is discredited and treated as trash. 
No art in this world is universally liked and understood, but every work of art should be given the chance to exist and influence people who want to discuss it. Art is at it’s best when it can make people think and feel more than they would alone, and Jake Smidt’s art does that. Hopefully, after seeing how well Jake explained the concept of his art, more people will seek to understand art that might confuse or disturb them, rather than dismissing it entirely.

Student’s artwork raises controversy

On the same day as the show opening, one of our artist’s work was called into question and displayed in the news! Jake Smidt, whose work is titled The Reality of the Spectacle, was interviewed by 9 News to defend his art against complaints made by students at the Hospitality Center.

We in the Drawing Program agree with Jake’s splendid defense of his chosen subject and were honestly surprised that any controversy arose over it. We were also somewhat amused, because Jake’s carefully thought out concept is based upon the spectacle society creates through media and his art was built around the idea of the media saturating the public with dramatic information and creating identity through the filter of spectacle— which is exactly what happened when the media made a story about his art.

While this event has been interesting for art students at Metro, it is also somewhat distressing due to the lack of respect shown to an artist’s work. When one person had a problem with the work displayed, Jake’s name and title card was torn off the wall and vanished. The school then, under the pretense that the art might be “rogue art” that was not part of the show, literally ripped the work off the wall. The two pieces were torn and damaged, then nailed (crooked and mixed up) back onto the wall for the news interview.

Such a volatile reaction from both the school and members of the public sparked discussion amongst our class about why art can be immediately discarded simply for being misunderstood or disliked. The consensus was that the public is not well educated in art and art history. Art tends to be the first subject cut from education systems and is usually the most starkly taught subject, often teaching students how to make art without giving much background to the history of art. Even at the university level, art is an optional subject and is not often expanded on for students not studying the subject as a major or minor.

The fact is that Jake’s work was meant to question why killers are given so much attention in society for terrible crimes, to question why we are drawn more to horrific stories than to productive ones, and also to explore how tragedy can affect society as it is displayed through media. His work was intended to make people think about how media works and affects their lives. But, when viewed by someone uneducated in the arts, it is discredited and treated as trash. 

No art in this world is universally liked and understood, but every work of art should be given the chance to exist and influence people who want to discuss it. Art is at it’s best when it can make people think and feel more than they would alone, and Jake Smidt’s art does that. Hopefully, after seeing how well Jake explained the concept of his art, more people will seek to understand art that might confuse or disturb them, rather than dismissing it entirely.

Alan Topp, Levels of Objects
Alan’s work revolves around the essence of objects, placing them on an equal, significant level, and exploring the resulting relationships between them. Each piece is drawn in ink and placed in it’s own frame, most of which were made by the artist. Alan Topp, Levels of Objects
Alan’s work revolves around the essence of objects, placing them on an equal, significant level, and exploring the resulting relationships between them. Each piece is drawn in ink and placed in it’s own frame, most of which were made by the artist. Alan Topp, Levels of Objects
Alan’s work revolves around the essence of objects, placing them on an equal, significant level, and exploring the resulting relationships between them. Each piece is drawn in ink and placed in it’s own frame, most of which were made by the artist. Alan Topp, Levels of Objects
Alan’s work revolves around the essence of objects, placing them on an equal, significant level, and exploring the resulting relationships between them. Each piece is drawn in ink and placed in it’s own frame, most of which were made by the artist.

Alan Topp, Levels of Objects

Alan’s work revolves around the essence of objects, placing them on an equal, significant level, and exploring the resulting relationships between them. Each piece is drawn in ink and placed in it’s own frame, most of which were made by the artist.